Causes of Hearing Loss

Many cases of hearing loss occur at birth, or within the first few years of life. These are typically genetic or caused by complications during the pregnancy or birth. Illnesses like meningitis, measles, or mumps can also cause hearing loss. However, many people who suffer hearing loss later in life experience it due to infection or long-term exposure to extreme sound.

Hypertension, diabetes, and other conditions can also put you at risk of hearing loss. If you’re worried about your hearing this World Hearing Day, the only surefire way to avoid hearing loss is to be aware of your surroundings and avoid situations where the volume can become detrimental. Wear earplugs if you work in an environment with high sounds, such as firing ranges, construction sites, and concert halls.

If you regularly find yourself listening to loud music over speakers or through headphones, consider turning down the volume. Many young people are experiencing hearing loss and tinnitus at younger ages, due to overexposure to loud music.

The only way to treat hearing loss is to recognize it and seek help. However, many people live with hearing loss so long that they don’t know they have it. The human brain is extremely good at adaptation and will adjust itself over time to accommodate for your hearing loss. However, the longer you go without treatment, the more intense the condition will become.

In order to prevent further damage, you must act. Knowing how the ear works is the first step to recognizing issues when they arise. Get your hearing tested often, and don’t hesitate to speak to an audiologist if you think there might be an issue with your hearing. If you do develop some form of hearing loss, identifying it early on can save you from further damage, and prevent stress, mental issues, and other side effects.